Categories
Ferments

Garlic Fermented in Honey

This simple technique provides preserved garlic plus a delicious garlic-infused fermented honey, which you want in your salad dressings, marinating your roasted veg, drizzled over pasta, and spooned into your mouth.

Ingredients

  • as much garlic as you want
  • unpasteurized honey

Step-by-step

  • Peel garlic cloves and place in a jar.
  • Pour honey so the cloves are submerged. 
  • Stir in a teaspoon of water, which kickstarts fermentation.
  • Loosely cover the jar with a lid and allow to ferment at room temperature for at least a month. I’ve gone up to a year, and the results were wildly intense, almost medicinal. The cloves may float to the top, particularly at the start of the fermentation period, so be sure to stir the garlic back under so it doesn’t spend too much time exposed to oxygen.
  • To store, just seal the lid tightly and keep at room temperature, using the garlic and infused honey as needed.
Categories
Ferments

Fermented Garlic Paste

Once this ingredient enters your kitchen, you will never be able to live without it again. I use the paste in place of minced garlic. It takes some time to peel all the garlic initially, but then all garlic prep is eliminated. Use this same technique with ginger, turmeric, or a mix, and feel free to add spices and herbs!

Ingredients

  • as much garlic as you can stand to peel
  • salt

Step-by-step

  • Peel the garlic. For maximum ease, smash each clove with the flat edge of a big kitchen knife. The skins then will slip right off. 
  • Using a blender or food processor, blend garlic to a paste.
  • Calculate salt. Find a jar big enough to fit garlic paste and still will have headspace to weigh down the paste while it ferments. Place empty jar on scale, power on and tare so the scale reads 0 grams. Spoon paste into jar, try to remove air pockets as you go, and measure weight of paste in grams. Multiply the weight by .02 (2 percent). This is the salt quantity. (For example, if the paste weights 300 grams, use 6 grams of salt.) Sprinkle salt on top of paste.
  • Weigh down contents of jar. The easiest way to weigh down the contents is with a Ziploc bag filled with water.
    Open Ziploc bag, and make sure there are no leaks. Put your fist inside, and press down onto the surface of the paste. Fold the outer edges of the bag over the sides of the jar. Fill the bag with water so it comes close to the top of the jar. Now place a rubber band around the top of the jar, which will keep the Ziploc bag in place.
  • Ferment: Allow jar to ferment at room temperature for 10 days to one month or longer.
  • After fermentation, carefully remove the weight. Store in an airtight container in fridge, where it will keep indefinitely. Use as you would minced garlic.
Categories
Ferments

Smoky Fermented Hot Sauce

Scrambled eggs, takeout pizza, fried rice, mac and cheese, roasted veg … are all improved with hot sauce. I don’t mean the stuff that makes your face sweat and your heart race and your brain fog over. Those are not culinary experiences I crave.

I want something with a balance of salty, sour, and umami flavors, and a kick of heat, just enough to wake up the palate a bit. I like to add chipotle peppers for some smokiness. This process takes a couple weeks, but it’s mostly hands off. And once it’s ready, you’ll have a shelf stable product to keep in the pantry forever. Although I doubt it will last very long, with all the meals you’ll be slathering it on.

Equipment

  • Kitchen scale

Ingredients

  • A handful of hot peppers of choice, stems removed (I like red jalapeños)
  • 2 ripe bell peppers (not the green ones) or a handful of sweet peppers, stems removed
  • 3-4 chipotle peppers (dried or the canned ones in adobo sauce)
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 onion
  • 4-6 garlic cloves, peeled
  • salt
  • fruit vinegar
  • cooking oil of choice

Step-by-step

  • Preheat oven to 450°F and lightly oil a baking pan. Remove skin and quarter onion. Cook onion in oven until charred — about 15 minutes.
  • Prep veggies by chopping into pieces that will fit in the blender. Be sure to use fresh veggies. Anything past its prime may encourage  mold and yeast growth during fermentation.
  • Blend onion, garlic, carrot, and peppers until smooth. Taste for heat level. Not hot enough? Add more hot peppers. Too hot? Add another carrot or bell pepper.
  • Calculate salt. Find a jar that is about double the volume of the veggie purée (the jar should have plenty of headspace for weighing down the contents ). Place empty jar on scale, power on and tare so the scale reads 0 grams. Pour purée into jar and measure weight in grams. Multiply the weight by .02 (2 percent). This is the salt quantity for the hot sauce. (For example, if the purée weights 300 grams, use 6 grams of salt.) Sprinkle salt on top of purée.
  • Weigh down contents of jar: Pepper purées can be very active during fermentation. Usually solids will separate from the liquid and rise to the top. They also have a tendency to grow kahm yeast in hot climates. The easiest and cleanest thing to do is to weigh down the contents with a Ziploc bag filled with water.
    Open Ziploc bag, and make sure there are no leaks.  put your fist inside, and press down onto the surface of the purée. Fold the outer edges of the bag over the sides of the jar. Fill bag with water. Ideally the weight of the water will be close to the weight of the purée, but eyeballing it is fine. Now place a rubber band around the top of the jar, which will keep the Ziploc bag in place.
  • Ferment: Allow jar to ferment at room temperature for 10-14 days (or longer!). Since this can be an active ferment, I recommend placing a kitchen towel underneath the jar to capture any spills. Also, the activity may push the water in the bag up and over the edge of the jar. Be sure to check often and add more water if necessary, so the purée is fully weighed down.
  • After fermentation, carefully remove the Ziploc bag. Blend fermented purée with an equal amount of fruit vinegar. This makes it shelf stable, plus the flavor is more complex with the acidity. Store in a tightly sealed bottle with very little headspace (the oxygen could potentially encourage mold growth). It will keep at room temperature indefinitely. If anxious about mold growth, the container can also be stored in the fridge, if you’re anxious about mold). I have stored jars of hot sauce for well over a year in the pantry, and I’ve never experienced any mold growth.
Categories
Ferments

Black Garlic

You are either the kind of person that is willing to keep a slow cooker plugged in for weeks at a time in service of delicious garlic, or you are not. This recipe is for those in the first camp. The results are most definitely worth it. If you like caramelized onions, you will adore black garlic. It’s sweet and deep and mellow- more candy than vegetable.

Equipment

  • a slow cooker with a “keep warm” setting

Ingredients

  • as many whole heads of garlic as you can get your hands on

Step-by-step

  • Place whole heads of garlic in slow cooker.
  • Plug it in, place on lid, and set to “keep warm” (which should be around 135°F).
  • Allow garlic to slowly transform into black gold over the course of 2-3 weeks. Open and reseal the lid every day or so to release excess moisture. The garlic is ready once the cloves are soft and black.
  • Store black garlic in fridge in an airtight container. It will keep indefinitely.
Categories
Ferments

Kosho

This past weekend’s Virtual Ferment Fest was an absolutely fabulous, heart-lifting, globe-spanning microbial love fest. For  the festival, I did a short and sweet demo on making kosho, a citrus and hot pepper paste and also my favorite condiment for all occasions. Watch me ham it up for the camera here. Or follow the written recipe below.

I like doing these demos, and want to make them a regular thing. If there is a fermentation technique (or other kitchen skill!) you’d like to be guided through live, shoot me an email at sunshineandmicrobes@gmail.com.

As you’ll see, this is more a loose guide than a recipe. I’m not telling you what exactly to use or how much. I want you to use your sensorial judgment. Be confident in your kitchen abilities and taste as you go!

Ingredients

  • Citrus (whatever you like, but skip the super sweet stuff like oranges, or use sparingly in combination with more acidic options like lemons and limes)
  • Hot peppers (pick your poison)
  • Salt

Step-by-step

  • Slice off a small segment of citrus that includes the rind and take a bite. If it isn’t crazy bitter, use the entire fruit. Simply slice and deseed. 
    If it is unpleasantly bitter, just use the rind and juice (not the white pith between the fruit and peel). Feel free to mix different types of citrus together. As for quantity, 2-3 medium lemons will make approximately 1 cup of kosho.
  • Prep the hot peppers.
    -If using a super hot variety, you may want to remove the seeds and interior white veins.
    -If using something milder, simply remove the stem.
    As for quantity, it’s all about preference. If I’m using something very mild like Shishito pepper, I might do equal parts citrus and peppers. If using something very hot, I’ll just throw one or two peppers in. For two lemons, one or two jalapeños is plenty hot for me. 
  • Blend citrus and hot peppers together in food processor. I prefer the consistency a bit on the chunky side.
  • Tightly pack the mixture into a clean mason jar, removing as many air pockets from the mixture as possible.
  • Weigh the contents of the jar to calculate how much salt to add. 
    An easy way to do this is by getting two jars of the same type — one empty and one filled with the mixture. Weigh the empty one on a kitchen scale, and press “tare” on the scale. Then switch it out for the filled jar. 
    Calculate 2 percent the weight of the mixture in salt. So if the mixture weighs 250 g, that would be 5 g salt, about a teaspoon’s worth. Also, don’t feel like bothering with weighing out all the ingredients? A teaspoon or two of salt per cup of citrus-pepper mixture should be just right.
  • Sprinkle the salt on top of the mixture. Use a wet cloth to clean the exposed interior sides of the jar and remove any bits of the mixture clinging to the walls (it’s unlikely, but they could get moldy).
  • Loosely cover and allow to ferment at room temperature for three days to two weeks. Since this is such a salty, acidic environment, it’s highly unlikely that any mold will grow on the mixture. If for whatever reason it does, just use a clean spoon and carefully skim it off, and then wipe again the interior sides of the jar.
  • When happy with the flavor, seal tightly and store in the fridge indefinitely.


Categories
Ferments

Sauerkraut

I have two early childhood sense memories of kraut. The first is the bigos — a hearty Polish stew filled with kraut, potatoes, and all the meats — my nanny Alina used to cook for me. When I went to visit Alina in her tiny Polish village in my twenties, she welcomed me with a pot of bigos. I started bawling as soon as I smelled it. 

The second is the slightly less romantic smell of my mother microwaving Boar’s Head sauerkraut directly in the plastic bag to eat with hot dogs as a snack. Definitely two extremes of the olfactory spectrum.

I forgot that sauerkraut existed until a handsome brewer I worked adjacent to in London encouraged me to make some. It was an ordeal, involving pink-stained wooden floors, the bucket of kraut getting buried under snow for months, and bugs. Lots of bugs. But even that first fiasco produced an absolutely divine final product, and I’ve been hooked ever since. I’ve refined my technique so that bugs and overwintering are no longer involved. In fact, making kraut is a snap, and I know you’re gonna love it!

Equipment

  • fermenting vessel: half gallon mason jar of ceramic crock
  • weight: small plates, rocks, ceramic weights, or water-filled ziplock bag
  • vessel cover: lid, kitchen towel and string

Ingredients

  • cabbage
  • salt
  • optional: any root veggies, apples, garlic, onions, herbs, spices

Step-by-step

  • Weigh the cabbage and other veggies. Measure out 1.5 percent of the weight in salt. For example, if I had 1000 g cabbage, I would multiply 1000 x .015 to equal 15 g salt. Set salt aside.
  • Wash cabbage and chop by hand or grate in a food processor with a slicer attachment blade (do NOT use a grater attachment; it will turn the cabbage to mush). The cabbage can be almost translucent or be thick and crunchy. No rules! Set aside a few outer cabbage leaves for packing the vessel.
    As you chop, place a handful or two of cabbage at a time in a mixing bowl and sprinkle a bit of the salt on it. Massage (squeeze and knead) the cabbage. As you continue to massage more cabbage and salt, liquid will begin to pool at the bottom of the bowl. The salt is drawing out the liquid, creating the all-important brine.* Mix in whatever else you like: Other veggies, spices, or herbs. 
    *This salty liquid brine creates the perfect anaerobic environment for fermentation to occur. The brine keeps out dangerous (rot and mold-causing) microorganisms while beneficial lactic acid bacteria flourish.
  • Put a handful of cabbage into the vessel and pack it down with your fist. Continue adding cabbage and packing it down tightly. The brine should begin to rise up over the cabbage. If this isn’t happening- spend more time massaging the cabbage.
    Once the vessel is about 2/3 filled, place a whole cabbage leaf or two over the top. This keeps little bits of cabbage from floating upwards out of the brine. 
  • Weigh down* all the cabbage so it remains fully submerged under the brine throughout the fermentation process. Loosely cover the vessel with a lid or a kitchen towel. Carbon dioxide produced during fermentation should be able to escape, but no dust or dog hair should be able to enter.
    *There are many ways to weigh down a fermenting veggie under brine- really whatever you can find that’s the right size and shape and heavy enough to keep the veggies submerged. In a large mason jar, fill a smaller mason jar with water and press it into the top of the cabbage. Or find and clean some large rocks. Or buy fermentation weights. Anything that will weigh down the veggies.
  • Let the kraut ferment at room temperature for 10 days to many months. The total fermentation time will depend on the kitchen temperature of your kitchen and personal preference. Check up on it every once in a while. Make sure the cabbage remains fully submerged in the brine.
  • After about 10 days, give it a taste. It will develop a lovely tangy flavor that will continue to change and gain complexity the longer it ferments.. I like the flavor of mine around two weeks.
    Once the flavor tastes pleasing, remove the weights and seal tightly. It will keep in the fridge indefinitely.

Notes

Flavor Ideas
  • Black kraut: apples, juniper berries, caraway seeds, and black peppercorns
  • Curry kraut: carrots, curry powder, fresh ginger and garlic
  • Chipotle kraut: chipotle powder, oregano, onions, garlic and a small handful of chopped fresh or dried pineapple
  • The Ground Floor Farm: garlic, rosemary, thyme, oregano, sage
  • Zaatar kraut: beets, zaatar, garlic
 
Mold + Yeast
Once in a blue moon, mold will grow on the surface of the kraut. This normally occurs because the veggies were not fully submerged in the brine. It’s no big deal. Just carefully skim it off the top, along with any tainted cabbage, and keep on fermenting. 
When it’s very hot outside, the kraut might develop a layer of kahm yeast, which looks white and cloudy (but not fuzzy like mold) and smells cheesy. It’s harmless, but may lead to an overly cheesy-tasting kraut. At the first site of kahm, carefully skim off as much as possible and cut the fermentation time short.
Categories
Ferments

Whole Wheat Sourdough Bread

This is my attempt to document my process for baking a loaf of whole wheat sourdough bread. It is the longest and most in-depth recipe I’ve included on the website to date. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at sunshineandmicrobes@gmail.com.

“One way to think about bread– and there are so many: as food or Food, matter and Spirit, commonplace, communion, metaphor, and medium (or exchange, transformation, sociality, etc.)– is simply this: as an ingenious technology for improving the flavor, digestibility, and nutritional value of grass.”

-Michael Pollan, Cooked

It can be challenging to understand the movements involved in each step without watching someone do them (and really…doing them yourself a bunch of times to build muscle memory). I’ve done my best to document the process with photos. It’s tough to be your own camera person when, for the most part, baking requires two hands! One day I’ll get my act together and make a video tutorial.

If you’ve got an active sourdough starter, you’re ready to start baking bread. If not, check out my method for building and maintaining a sourdough starter here.

Equipment

  • Kitchen scale
  • Dutch oven or other oven safe pot with lid
  • large mixing bowl
  • bowl or proofing basket
  • kitchen towel
  • razor blade, sharp knife, or kitchen scissors

Ingredients

  • 510 g water (a shade or two colder than room temperature)
  • 600 g whole wheat bread flour* see note on flour type below the recipe
  • 100 g active sourdough starter
  • 15 g  salt

Step-by-step

Feed Your Starter
  • 4-6 hours before mixing, feed the sourdough starter. In a clean jar, thoroughly mix 50 g starter with 50 g rye or whole wheat flour and 50 g room temperature or cooler water. Loosely cover and allow to rise at room temperature. The starter is ready to use when it is aerated throughout, at least doubled in volume, smells pleasantly sour, and a small plop of it floats in water.
    sourdough starter
Mix Ingredients
  • In a large bowl, mix 450 g water and all flour. Mix well until no dry bits of flour can be detected. Let mixture sit, loosely covered with a kitchen towel, for 30 minutes to 1 hour. This allows the flour to absorb the water and makes the dough easier to manipulate.
    dough mixing collage
  • Add sourdough starter and 30 g water to dough and aggressively mix until fully incorporated. Squish the dough between your fingers as if you had crab claws. Then scoop from the bottom of the bowl and fold the dough up over onto itself. (If that’s confusing, check out a visual at 2:10 of this video tutorial) Let mixture sit, covered, for 30 minutes. 
    Don’t forget to feed what’s left of the sourdough starter and store it in the fridge until your next bake.
  • Add salt and 30 g water and mix in the same manner as above until fully incorporated. Give the dough a full 5-10 minutes of mixing using the folding method from above. This long mix will strengthen the gluten network.
1st Rise
  • Allow the dough to sit loosely covered with the kitchen towel for roughly 5-6 hours. Yeasts and lactic acid bacteria will ferment the dough, filling it with carbon dioxide bubbles. During the first 2-3 hours of the rise, stretch and fold the dough every 30 minutes. To do this, wet your hands, grab one edge of the dough from the bottom of the bowl. Stretch it up and fold it into the center over the remainder of the dough. Turn bowl and repeat until you have folded the north, south, east, and west of the dough. (Here’s a video) With each stretch and fold, you’ll be able to feel the dough become stronger and more extensible.
  • Let the dough sit covered and undisturbed for the remainder of the 1st rise. The rise is complete when the dough is aerated throughout, the volume has roughly doubled, and the dough feels pillowy and alive. The temperature of in the kitchen and the dough itself will impact how long this process takes (colder = slower fermentation, hotter = faster).
    risen dough
Shaping
  • Fill a small bowl with water to keep your hands and the work surface wet throughout this process. 
  • Remove the dough from the bowl by tipping the bowl onto the counter and using your fingers to gently pull it from the sides of the bowl. Using the same stretch and fold technique from the first rise, gently flatten the dough out (just a bit!) and fold it into a package , then flip it so the side with the seams is down and the smooth side is up. This gives the dough an initial shape and structure. Let rest for 15-25 minutes.
  • To give the dough it’s final shape, with wet hands and a wet surface, flip the loaf over (smooth side down). For this process, use the stretch and fold technique, but instead of 4 folds, make 5-7, as if folding little flower petals of dough into the center of the loaf. Turn the dough over so the pretty side is facing up.
  • Place a kitchen towel in a bowl or proofing basket. Sprinkle very generously with flour. Place shaped loaf, smooth side down, into the basket. Cover with the remainder of the kitchen towel.
    dough in proofing basket
2nd Rise
  • Place the loaf in the fridge for 12-48 hours. The dough will continue to ferment, developing nuances in flavor and texture.
Baking
  • Place Dutch oven with lid on into oven and preheat to 500 °F. Allow Dutch oven to heat for at least 25 minutes. 
  • Remove loaf from fridge and dust with flour. 
    floured dough
  • Once oven is heated, remove Dutch oven with oven mitts. Carefully flip the loaf into the vessel, floured side down. Using a razor blade or sharp knife (just the tip), score the bread by confidently and quickly cutting a line across the top of the loaf, which will help steam escape and the dough expand in the oven. Alternatively, make a few snips in the top using kitchen scissors.
    scored dough
  • Using oven mitts, place the lid back on the pot and return to oven. In the hot oven, the water in the dough will evaporate, bathing the dough in steam inside the Dutch oven. In this steamy environment, the interior structure (crumb) will expand and begin to solidify. Bake for 20 minutes with the lid on, then remove the lid and bake for another 15- 20 minutes, so the crust can brown. The loaf is ready once it sounds hollow when you knock its bottom. 
  • Let it fully cool on a rack or propped up on its side. The bread is still cooking at this point as steam escapes the loaf and the fragile internal structure gels. Cutting into it too soon will significantly shorten the shelf life. But if you’re planning to eat the whole loaf right then and there, don’t worry about waiting and just tear into it!
    bread crumbshot

Notes

*A note on flour: The type of flour you use impacts  the bread’s flavor and texture. This has to do with various factors (wheat variety, milling method, enzymatic activity), but the most important factor is gluten (aka protein) content. The stronger the gluten, the airier the loaf.** Gluten content depends on the variety of wheat used and what time of year it was grown. Bread flour has a higher gluten content than pastry flour. White flour has more gluten than whole wheat. 
Whole wheat flour has other important stuff like FIBER and FLAVOR, so I prefer to save white flour for special occasions (and pizza) and bake almost exclusively with whole grain flours. 
Because of the lower gluten content, baking with whole wheat is more challenging than with white flour, since gluten keeps everything knitted together.  Newer bakers (or anyone looking for a super airy crumb) may choose to replace a third or even a half of the total whole wheat flour with white bread flour. If adding white flour, reduce total water for the recipe to 450 g.
**Serious bakers who want a deeper understanding of gluten, start here.
Categories
Ferments Kitchen Basics

Whole Grain Mustard

Homemade mustard is infinitely more delicious than store bought. The end.

Makes: 1 cup

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup mustard seeds
  • 1/3 cup fruit vinegar (apple cider works great or try our fruit vinegar recipe!)
  • 1/3 cup beer of choice
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • big pinch of red pepper flakes
  • 2 tablespoons chopped herbs of choice
  • 2 tablespoons liquid fermentation starter (kombucha, water kefir, leftover brine from veggie ferment, etc)
  • Optional flavor add-ins: chipotle pepper, garlic, curry powder, kosho, smoked paprika, or whatever your heart desires

Step-by-step

  • Mix all the ingredients together in a container (I use a mason jar) and loosely cover. Let it sit undisturbed at room temperature, fermenting for 3 days to 2 weeks (the longer, the more sour). 
  • Blend until mustard seeds begin to break apart and a textured paste forms. The mixture will be a little thin initially but will firm up after a few hours in the fridge. Mustard keeps for months (or probably years) stored in the fridge.

Notes

adapted from David Lebovitz, who adapted it from the Joe Beef cookbook
Categories
Ferments Kitchen Basics

Cultured Butter

Butter — called “coagulated sunlight” by the poet Seamus Heaney — is one life’s great luxuries. By fermenting cream before churning it, we can produce butter with an incredible depth of flavor, plus a healthy dose of beneficial bacteria. 

Making butter is easy peasy, but it’s useful to understand the science behind the transformation taking place in your food processor. Butter is the solid fat that separates from cream when it has been churned or agitated. By agitating the cream (basically just jostling everything around a bunch), the membranes of the butterfat are ruptured, allowing the butterfat to stick together and form large fat globules.

Equipment

  • food processor
  • mesh sieve
  • an incubator (Don’t be scared! This can be as simple as a thermos filled with warm water. See below for details)

Ingredients

  • heavy cream (the nicer the cream, the nicer the butter, so stick with local, pastured, or organic)
  • a small amount of yogurt
  • salt (optional, but you really should)

Step-by-step

Culturing the Cream
  • Mix together a tablespoon of yogurt for every 2 pints of cream in a glass jar. Thoroughly mix and incubate for 6-24 hours. (See instructions below.) The cream will thicken a bit and taste pleasingly sour. Stick it in the fridge and allow to chill for at least 12 hours before churning.
Incubation
  • In order for the cream to ferment, it must incubate at a steady temperature of 110 °F for 6-24 hours. There are several ways to do this. Here are a few:
    In an insulated cooler. Place container of cream in the cooler. Pour 110 °F water about 3/4 of the way up the jar. Close lid tightly and wrap the cooler in a blanket. Check every couple of hours, and replace the water if it gets too cool.
    In a slow cooker. Program a slow cooker to 110 °F. Place the container of cream inside. Wrap the slow cooker in a towel and let it incubate. Instant Pots also have an incubating function.
    In a gas oven with the pilot light lit. A gas oven, turned off but with the pilot light lit, maintains a temperature of approximately 110 °F. Also a fancy electric oven may be able to set the temperature to 110 °F.
Churning the Butter
  • Once cream is fully chilled, place in food processor and blend until the solid butter separates from the liquid buttermilk. The cream will go through several transformations, first rising and turning into whipped cream, and then sinking a bit and getting grainy, before fully separating into butter and buttermilk.
  • Place a mesh sieve over a bowl and pour in the contents of the food processor. The solid butter will remain in the sieve while the buttermilk will drain out into the bowl below.
    Over the sieve, knead the butter to remove as much liquid as possible. To do this, press a blob of butter between your flattened palms, fold butter in half, press again, repeat until little to no buttermilk weeps out. Repeat with remaining butter until everything looks smooth (like buttah!)
  • Mix in salt and other flavorings with the butter. Be sure to save buttermilk for cooking, baking (pancakes, biscuits, or DIY hair conditioner).

Notes

Don’t feel like fermenting the cream? Just use regular heavy cream and start at the churning the butter step. It won’t be quite as delicious, but it definitely works in a pinch!
Categories
Ferments Kitchen Basics

Sourdough Pizza

I’m mighty proud of this pizza dough. If your sourdough starter is bubbly and happy, get ready for some pizza bliss. This recipe can also be used for focaccia and even bread dough in a pinch.

Makes: 1 large pizza

Ingredients

  • 500 g flour (I use 100 g whole wheat flour and 400 g white bread flour, but feel free to play)
  • 10 g salt 
  • 350 g lukewarm water (around 90 °F, depending on factors like the weather and flour temp)
  • 75 g active sourdough starter
  • 1/4 c extra-virgin olive oil

Step-by-step

  • Add all ingredients together and mix until thoroughly incorporated. Squish the dough between your hands and fold it over onto itself until there are no more bits of flour.
  • Place in an airtight container that’s large enough for the dough to roughly double in size. Place in fridge for 24-72 hours. 
  • Two to three hours before baking pizza, remove dough from fridge. Line a rimmed baking sheet* with parchment and cover with a thin layer of olive oil. Fold the sides of the dough onto itself so it forms a little package, and place, smooth side up, on baking sheet. Coat dough with a bit more olive oil.  Every hour or so, gently and evenly press down the dough with your fingers until it fills the pan. 
  • Add toppings and bake in a screaming hot oven for 25 minutes. 

Notes

* For a thin crust pizza, I recommend using roughly 600 g of pizza dough on a half pan baking sheet. For smaller pans, use less dough.
 
Got a pizza stone or baking steel? Skip the pan and make a lovely crisp crust. YouTube has a million pizza shaping tutorials.
 
Need a great sauce? We got you.